Download Dance, Human Rights, and Social Justice: Dignity in Motion by Naomi Jackson, Toni Shapiro-Phim PDF

By Naomi Jackson, Toni Shapiro-Phim

Dance, Human Rights, and Social Justice: Dignity in movement offers a wide-ranging compilation of essays, spanning greater than 15 nations. prepared in 4 elements, the articles research the rules and exploitation of dancers and dance job through govt and authoritative teams, together with abusive remedy of dancers in the dance occupation; choreography concerning human rights as a crucial topic; the engagement of dance as a method of therapeutic sufferers of human rights abuses; and nationwide and native social/political routine during which dance performs a robust function in supporting humans struggle oppression. those groundbreaking papers? either particular scholarship and riveting own bills? surround a vast spectrum of concerns, from slavery and the Holocaust to the Bosnian and Rwandan genocides to the Israeli-Palestinian clash; from First modification situations and the A.I.D.S. epidemic to discrimination caused by age, gender, race, and incapacity. more than a few teachers, choreographers, dancers, and dance/movement therapists draw connections among refugee camp, court docket, theater, practice session studio, and college lecture room.

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Additional resources for Dance, Human Rights, and Social Justice: Dignity in Motion

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The moral opposition to the NEA coalesced around art concerned with women, homosexuals, and minorities. In 1994, when Newt Gingrich became Speaker of the House of Representatives, the situation worsened and NEA funding plummeted. As an example, in 1980 “total NEA funding for dance was $8,631,567. By 1996 it had dropped to $2,725,000” (quoted in Shelley Masar, “The Culture Wars Are Over—For Now,” The Urbana-Champaign Independent Media Center, Sept. htm). In 1997, the House of Representatives voted to abolish the NEA by eliminating funding altogether.

In terms of modern thought, the notion has existed under several names since the thirteenth century and the Magna Carta. ” Such rights belonged to a person by nature and because he was a human being endowed with reason (and by implication knew right from wrong). Locke formulated the classic trinity of these natural rights as life, liberty, and property. In the late 1700s the American Declaration of Independence and the French Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen drew heavily on Locke’s notion.

Locke formulated the classic trinity of these natural rights as life, liberty, and property. In the late 1700s the American Declaration of Independence and the French Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen drew heavily on Locke’s notion. While the idea of natural rights became increasingly challenged along philosophical lines, certain humanitarian organizations took hold in the 1800s, keeping the basic concept alive. These organizations grew up in relation to a number of important social movements in the United States, including the abolitionist movement, the women’s suffrage movement, and the labor movement, which addressed issues such as brutal working conditions, starvation wages, and child labor.

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